Leiden Anthropology Blog

rss

Tag: Fieldwork

  • Learning and belonging in ladies-only kickboxing

    Learning and belonging in ladies-only kickboxing

    Kickboxing has been promoted to young Muslim and Moroccan-Dutch women as a tool for empowerment. How can we understand their participation in sports? How are their practices influenced by dominant discourses, policies, and media on the female Muslim body?
  • Ethnography and the work of the ancestors

    Ethnography and the work of the ancestors

    Fieldwork makes one think again about one’s own society. This blog is about how fieldwork taught me what ancestors mean in South Africa and forced me to think again about attitudes to ancestors in Europe.
  • The anthropologist and the key

    The anthropologist and the key

    This year’s ‘Veldwerk NL’ students revealed the importance of the key in anthropological research. It not only symbolises access, it creates possibilities to break down prejudices and pave the way to constructive human interaction.
  • The revival of hunter-gatherer research

    The revival of hunter-gatherer research

    In September, 50 years after the famous Man the Hunter symposium (1965), the International Society for Hunter Gatherer Research celebrated its foundation at the vibrant, interdisciplinary CHAGS conference, launching the Hunter Gatherer Research Journal.
  • Cold showers and amazing little buckets

    Cold showers and amazing little buckets

    A story on how students from Leiden went to do research on problems with water in the Philippines and then very physically experienced their research topic. Or: How you can have both too little and too much water at the same time.
  • Postcards from the field

    Postcards from the field

    Just before leaving for my fieldwork I received a gift from two of my colleagues to take with me: a set of colouring pencils and blank postcards. What became of these empty pages and the promise to send drawings home while I was in the field?
  • January: Fieldwork Month

    January: Fieldwork Month

    January is traditionally known as the leatherworking month or wolf month, but I spent this January involved in the anthropological tradition of fieldwork, by supervising four groups of students carrying out field research on De Veluwe.
  • Filming autism

    Filming autism

    Various visual anthropologists work in healthcare. Why is that? I found out when I started following my brother with a camera, the moment he was diagnosed with autism at age 42.
  • Carrying a talisman: a valid fieldwork method

    Carrying a talisman: a valid fieldwork method

    Some fieldwork encounters radically change our perspective. However, it often seems that such encounters depend more on a dose of good luck than on careful planning. My research as well took a radically different turn after one such lucky rendezvous.
  • The daily  life of an anthropologist?

    The daily life of an anthropologist?

    Anthropologists are known for studying how people go about their every day lives. It may be interesting to turn the tables and ask what a day in the life of an anthropologist looks like.
  • Anthropologists in the company of gatekeepers

    Anthropologists in the company of gatekeepers

    My recent start of new fieldwork in Suriname and French Guiana raises interesting questions about ‘entering the field’. How is it that the process of negotiating access to people and places is in itself a major source of knowledge about power relations?
  • Liberating visual methods

    Liberating visual methods

    New adventures have appeared in the field of Anthropology. ‘Liberating!’ students say. Social theory and fieldwork combine in new ways, thanks to contemporary audiovisual practices. A glimpse into a few experiences.
  • Intercultural love in Lovina

    Intercultural love in Lovina

    Masterstudent Cecile Schimmel is doing fieldwork in Indonesia. Her research is on intercultural love relationships, her location Lovina Beach, northern Bali. She applies Visual Ethnography as a method. A report from the field by a visiting lecturer.